Bridges 2014
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Lucas Champollion is an assistant professor at the NYU Department of Linguistics in New York City. He received a Master of Science in Engineering from Penn's Department of Computer and Information Science in 2007 and a PhD degree from the Department of Linguistics at the University of Pennsylvania in December 2010. From 2009 to summer 2010 he was a visiting researcher at the Natural Language Theory and Technology Group at the Palo Alto Research Center (formerly Xerox PARC) and an exchange scholar at the Department of Linguistics at Stanford, and from 2010 to 2012 he was a postdoctoral researcher at the Tübinger Zentrum für Linguistik (TüZLi) at the Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen. For more information, visit his website.

David Chalmers is a Distinguished Professor of Philosophy and director of the Centre for Consciousness at ANU, and Professor of Philosophy and co-director of the Center for Mind, Brain, and Consciousness at NYU. He studied mathematics at the University of Adelaide from 1983 to 1986 and at the University of Oxford in 1987-88 and obtained a PhD in 1993 in Philosophy and Cognitive Science, working in Douglas Hofstadter's Center for Research on Concepts and Cognition. He was a McDonnell Fellow in Philosophy, Neuroscience, and Psychology at Washington University in St. Louis, and worked in the Department of Philosophy at UC Santa Cruz as well as in the Department of Philosophy and the Center for Consciousness Studies at the University of Arizona before he moved to ANU in August 2004. Chalmers is especially interested in consciousness, but also in a wide range of other issues in the philosophy of mind and language, metaphysics and epistemology, and the foundations of cognitive science. Recent publications include Constructing the World (Oxford University Press, 2012). For more information, visit his website.

Branden Fitelson is Professor of Philosophy at Rutgers University and visiting Professor of Philosophy at the Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University (LMU) in Munich. Before teaching at Rutgers and LMU, he held teaching positions at UC-Berkeley, San José State, and Stanford. Fitelson got his MA and PhD in philosophy from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Before getting into philosophy, he studied math and physics at UW-Madison, and worked as a research scientist for a NASA contractor. His research interests include theories of confirmation, accuracy, and coherence as well as topics in probability theory and Bayesian reasoning. Forthcoming publications include Individual Coherence and Group Coherence (in Essays in Collective Epistemology). For more information, visit his website.

Alvin I. Goldman is a Professor of Philosophy at Rutgers University in New Jersey. He previously taught at the University of Michigan and at the University of Arizona. Goldman earned his PhD from Princeton University and has done influential work on a wide range of philosophical topics, his principal areas of research being epistemology, philosophy of mind, and cognitive science. Portions of this work forge links between philosophy and empirical science, especially psychology, cognitive neuroscience, and the social sciences. Goldman's early book, A Theory of Human Action, presents a systematic way of classifying and relating the many actions we perform at any time. Recent publications in cognitive science (especially Simulating Minds: The Philosophy, Psychology and Neuroscience of Mindreading, 2006) might even be characterized as theoretical science rather than philosophy of science. For more information, visit his website.

Stephan Hartmann is Chair of Philosophy of Science at LMU Munich and Co-Director of the Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy (MCMP). From 2007 to 2012 he worked at Tilburg University, The Netherlands, where he was Chair in Epistemology and Philosophy of Science. Before moving to Tilburg, he was Professor of Philosophy at the London School of Economics and Director of LSE's Centre for Philosophy of Natural and Social Science. Hartmann’s primary research and teaching areas are philosophy of science, philosophy of physics, formal epistemology, and social epistemology. His publications include the book Bayesian Epistemology (Oxford University Press, 2003). His current research interests include formal social epistemology, inter-theoretic relations, and (imprecise) probabilities in quantum mechanics. For more information, visit his website.

Hannes Leitgeb completed a Masters (1997) and a PhD degree (1998) in mathematics and a PhD degree (2001) in philosophy, each at the University of Salzburg, where he later also worked as an Assistant Professor at the Department of Philosophy. In 2007 he became Professor of Mathematical Logic and Philosophy of Mathematics. In autumn 2010 Leitgeb became Chair of Logic and Philosophy of Language, Alexander von Humboldt Professor, and Head of the Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy at the LMU Munich. His research interests range from logic to epistemology, philosophy of mathematics, philosophy of language, and the philosophy as well as the history of science. Recent publications include Scientific Philosophy, Mathematical Philosophy, and All That (Meta-philosophy, 2013). At present, Hannes Leitgeb is writing two monographs: In the one he develops a unified theory of qualitative and quantitative belief. In the other he tries to resurrect Carnap's Logical Structure of the World. For more information, visit his website.

Kristina Liefke just completed her PhD project at the Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy (MCMP) and the Tilburg Center for Logic and Philosophy of Science (TiLPS). Until 2009, she studied linguistics and philosophy at Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, and at UCLA. Kristina's research is at the interface of logic, linguistics, and philosophy. She is particularly interested in the philosophical and logical foundations of formal semantics (esp. type-logical semantics and natural language metaphysics). Her dissertation, A Single-Type Semantics for Natural Language (supervised by Stephan Hartmann), provides a semantics for a Montague-style fragment of English which interprets linguistic expressions through the use of only one basic type of object. For more information, visit her website.

Sebastian Lutz received his diploma in theoretical physics from the University of Hamburg, was a visiting student fellow at the Minnesota Center for Philosophy of Science on a Fulbright scholarship and a graduate student in the Philosophy department at the University of Western Ontario. Sebastian has been a PhD researcher under Thomas Müller, Janneke van Lith, and Albert Visser in the Theoretical Philosophy Unit at Utrecht University in the Netherlands, and received his PhD in 2012. He is currently a postdoctoral fellow at the MCMP. In his works, he focuses on philosophical methodology, foundations of philosophy of science, empirical significance, inter-theoretical relations, the history of logical empiricism, and formal methods in ethics. For more information, visit his website.

Tim Maudlin is a Professor of Philosophy at New York University. His interests are primarily focused on the foundations of physics, metaphysics, and logic. He holds a BA degree in physics and philosophy from the university of Yale and a PhD in history and philosophy of science from the University of Pittsburgh. His books include Quantum Non-Locality and Relativity, Truth and Paradox, The Metaphysics Within Physics, and Philosophy of Physics: Space and Time. He is a member of the Academie Internationale de Philosophie des Sciences and the Foundational Questions Institute (FQXi). He has been a Guggenheim Fellow. He taught at Rutgers from 1986 to 2011 and has been a visiting professor at Harvard. For more information, visit his website.

Thomas Meier completed the first years of his undergraduate studies at the Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas, Mexico. There he started to develop a strong interest in formal philosophy, especially in logic, philosophy of language, epistemology and philosophy of science. He finished his M.A. at LMU Munich in 2011 with the thesis "A logical reconstruction of Leonard Bloomfield's theory of structural linguistics". Currently, Meier is a doctoral student at the Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy (MCMP). His research interests include the general philosophy of science, the history of the philosophy of science, philosophy of linguistics, and philosophy of language. For more information, visit his website.

Roland Poellinger is a postdoctoral research fellow at the Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy (MCMP) at LMU Munich where he received his PhD in logic and philosophy of science with a dissertation on models of causal knowledge in 2012. He has been teaching topics from logic and philosophy of science at LMU Munich, Venice International University, the University of Mainz, Germany, and the University of Pécs, Hungary, where he is a regular member of the Graduate School of Philosophy. His current research interests include methods and principles of causal modeling, inference in Bayesian networks and the foundations of artificial intelligence. For more information, visit his website.

Michael Strevens is a Professor of Philosophy at New York University. He studied Philosophy, Mathematics, and Computer Science at the University of Auckland and got his PhD in Philosophy at Rutgers University in 1996. Strevens works in the philosophy of science include topics such as scientific explanation, complex systems, probability, confirmation, the social structure of science, the nature of causation, the psychology of concepts, and the philosophical applications of cognitive science. Recent publications include the book Depth: An Account of Scientific Explanation (Harvard University Press, 2008). For more information, visit his website.